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will give me a chance to have a mini "west wing" reunion. and a member of the science commit me who thinks science is alive from the pit of hell. and he thinks he's a scientist. also tonight steve mor continue -- martin decided to do his political commercial, one of those guys, steve martin or bob kerrey will join me to explain why steve did that. everyone in the nicu, all the nurses wanted to watch him when he was there 118 days. everything that you thought was important to you changes in light of having a child that needs you every moment. i wouldn't trade him for the world. who matters most to you says the most about you. massmutual is owned by our policyholders so they matter most to us. if you're caring for a child with special needs, our innovative special care program offers strategies that can help. >>> coming up, mitt romney tried to play a moderate at the debate last week. this week, paul ryan's going to give it a shot. he's never played that part before. ryan versus biden is next. former nebraska senator bob kerrey will talk about his race to get back into the senate and how he
's not an exact science, it's a snapshot in time. we will see if governor romney can sustain this bounce. the president got one ahead of his convention. it dissipated. romney got one out of the first debate. we'll see if it lasts. this science is not exact but it's pretty darned good. if you look back over time, it's pretty darned good. when you see the conspiracy theories you have to say it's the politics of the moment. every now and then you see a poll that you say well, that doesn't look right. i look at ours every time before we put them on the air and the guys who do it for us do it just right. >> go ahead, gloria. >> anderson, i also think it actually kind of affects the campaign in its own way because as the old saying goes, nothing sticks to you like success so when you have a candidate like mitt romney who has been down, maybe some of his voters are less enthusiastic because they think oh, he might not win. suddenly, he's got the wind at his back. suddenly they're thinking gosh, maybe this guy can win, maybe i ought to turn out and vote. then his base might become more enthusias
think he did it here. let's watch. >> it's not rocket science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations that he has for himself. but, look, i think part of that was because, as i said earlier, we met a new mitt romney. we met a mitt romney that wanted to walk away from the central theory of his economic plan which is his tax cut. i don't have a tax cut that's $4.8 trillion or $5 trillion. i'm not going to cut taxes on the rich. i don't have a medicare voucher plan. i love teachers, i think we need more of them. i mean, look, don't believe me, speaker gingrich was pretty eloquent in running during the primaries in saying, look, mitt romney will say absolutely anything to get elected. >> well, one thing i have been saying about the campaign is the president needs surrogates out there, he needs confederates, people out there. i love charleston. a lot of people -- rather charlotte because in charlotte you heard an entire political party speaking led by people like deval patrick, the governor of massachusetts, after you saw mr. mayor. i think it sounds be
't believe science. wait until you catch this science committee in the house and its membership. this is "hardball," the place for politics. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 let's talk about low-cost investing. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 at schwab, we're committed to offering you tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 low-cost investment options-- tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like our exchange traded funds, or etfs tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 which now have the lowest tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 operating expenses tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 in their respective tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lipper categories. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lower than spdr tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and even lower than vanguard. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 that means with schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 your portfolio has tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 a better chance to grow. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and you can trade all our etfs online, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 commission-free, from your schwab account. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 so let's talk about saving money, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with schwab etfs. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 schwab etfs now have the lowest
. another standout stock, gilead sciences is up 70% year-to-date, ubs has it as its top large tech biotech pick, it's attractively trading to a discount to the biotech sector, biogen up 50% in the past year thanks to its strong earnings performance and anticipation riding behind its multiple sclerosis drug bg12 which could get approval by year's end. another is buyout speculation. the firms are on the hunt for under the radar biotech firms, bristol-myers among others making big bets. andrew you've been following that as well. >> thank you for that report. lot of beta. see if there's any alpha. >>> in the next hour of "squawk box" former ubs american chairman robert wolf will join us to talk financials, jobs and the election, mr. obama's favorite banker. and later health care, a major issue for americans in the presidential candidates, the coo of mt. sinai, ken david, is going to join us. a crash management system and the world's only tridion safety cell which can withstand over three and a half tons. small in size. big on safety. which can withstand over three and a half tons. if we want t
in math and science. he was even the science student of the year at the university of illinois. but after his adoptive mother passed away, ellis oon dropped t of school and headed to california with little money in his pocket. his skills were quickly recognized. he helped build the first ibm compatible mainframe system. in 1977, he and two of his colleagues broke off and started a company that would eventually become oracle. ellison took the company public in 1986, already a billion-dollar enterprise. now a $100 billion company, his mystique has grown as a billionaire who lives on the edge. he's made shareholders nervous while suffering body blows from mountain biking and surfing. he won a yacht race in sidney overcoming hurricane-strength winds that sank five competitors and drowned six participants. some have speculated he's the inspiration for the tony stark character in "the iron man" films, with ellison even making a cameo in the most recent sequel. ellison's passion for boating it now focused on the america's cup competition. >> this sis extreme sailing. >> he's the principle suppor
of public polling has their own art and science to likely voting and it is pretty much an art as it is a science a. lot of people had the art wrong going into the late primaries. that's why you saw early polls in the primaries being way off because you're likely voter didn't look like the electorate turned out. we had 11% of the general electorate in '08, so the screen was completely off. typically, you're going to undersample minorities and all young people in all these polls. that said, a big difference between a registered voter and likely voter, it's someone who says they're likely to vote high on their propensity up front on the phone call say they're going to vote and or they have some past performance in their background where they voted in one of the two or two of the three general elections. there's an art to this. on this point, i don't play the polling game back and forth, but a seven-point swing in party identification toward republicans, i think goes a long way to explain this. i know this is a story that the media wants to drive, but at the same time, you have a
science professor samuel popkin, author of "the candidate: what it takes to win and hold the white house." he's been a democratic presidential campaign adviser since 1972, working with george mcgovern, jimmy carter, bill clinton and al gore. professor, great to have you hire. let's start with thursday's vice presidential debate. what does joe biden and paul ryan have to do to outdo each other, to win? >> well, the job is not to be gladiators, because it doesn't matter which of them is better in a cage fight. the question is what can they do to strengthen the way people approach the presidential debate. biden has to find a way to put romney on the spot, not ryan on the spot. >> andrew sullivan has a new article on the daily beast website called "did president obama just throw the entire election away?" and he writes in part, "i've never seen a candidate self-destruct for no external reason this late in the campaign before. i'm trying to see a silver lining, but when a president self-imlates on live tv and his opponent shines with lies and smiles and a record number of people watch, it's h
another 100,000 new math and science teachers. and create two million more slots in our community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs that are out there right now. and i want to make sure we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree our corporate tax rate is too high, so i want to lower it, particularly for manufacturing, taking it down to 25%. i also wants to close those loopholes that are giving incentives for companies that are shipping jobs overseas. i want to provide tax breaks for companies that are investing here in the united states. on energy, governor romney and i both agree we need to boost american energy production. and oil and natural gas production are higher than they've been in years. but i also believe that we have to look at the energy sources of the future, like wind, solar and biofuels. and to make those investments so all this is possible -- now, in order for to us do it, we have to close our deficit, and one of the things we've been discussing tonight, how do we deal with our tax code and make s
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> at this very minute. the news minute on tv and online the news media were flooding you with information about who won the debate. i used to be one of those guys. i knew for sure that john kerry won all three of his debates against george bush. but of course he didn't. this is a good time to think about what it means to win a debate. in high school and college debates there are judges to decide which debaters who actually won. those debates have real winners. winners who get real trophies. no one got a trophy but plenty of people guessed at who would have gotten a trophy. the question is they were debating for votes and those votes wouldn't be counted until next month. so all of the winner talk you have been hearing is just guessing and all of the guessers have been wrong before. my guess is about who won debates have been wrong many times which is why it was so easy for me to resist guessing who one last night. you know court reporters are smarter about this. court reporters have
are crack pots on science and women's issues. that was a real chance for barack obama to say i have defended this whole time. >> and legislation that lets you take care of yourself. >> that to me was very striking as well as someone who works in this body that has about 10% approval rating from the american people. how do you -- >> and falling. >> exactly. how do you talk about -- i mean are you struck by how little congressional obstruction? >> essentially, romney just -- it was a game changer when he said he wants to tax the rich, regulation is essential. he cares for the poor and the elderly. what planet are we on after the two years he went through? that was when obama -- debate is about an emotional tone and connection and the issues we talk about are in service of that. that was the opportunity for obama to hold him accountable. what about mitch mcconnell who said his goal is to make me a one-term president. what about the debt ceiling where you push me over the cliff with no plan. what about the budget plan where we were about to shut out the lights in government? there was a fight fo
the transcontinental railroad. let's start the national academy of sciences. let's start land grant colleges, because we want to give these gateways of opportunity for all americans because if all americans are getting opportunity we're all going to be better off. that doesn't restrict people's freedom. that enhances it. so what i've tried to do as president is to apply those same principles. and when it comes to education what i've said is we've got to reform schools that are not working. we used something called race to the top. it wasn't a top-down approach, governor. what we've said to states, we'll give you more money if you initiate reforms. and as a consequence, you had 46 states around the country who have made a real difference. but what i've also said is let's hire another 100,000 math and science teachers to make sure we maintain our technological lead to make sure our skilled and able to succeed and hard-pressed states right now can't all do that. in fact we've seen layoffs of hundreds of thousands of teachers over the last several years, and governor romney doesn't think we need more tea
of jealousy. >> he's advancing science and he'll do a great job. >> reporter: and that's key here. the records mean a lot. but what this team wants to get out of this is the scientific and aerospace advancements. they want to see if that suit that felix is going to wear is going to be the next generation spacesuit, to see if people can survive outside a space vehicle inside event of a malfunction. >> what a soir, brian, thank you. >>> you're in "the situation room." happening now, mitt romney says president obama is leading from behind. but he isn't the first to use that description. we have the reporter who heard it first from a member of the obama administration. >>> we also have inside information about vice president joe biden's preparations for his crucial debate with paul ryan. and depending on how old you are, you're going to find out how much money you will need to save right now to have a comfortable retirement. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin this hour with mitt romney's declarati
science. you don't want to pick winners and losers in the companies that are going to survive. national science foundation obviously. >> good loan guarantees can be targeted. there are many ways to do things. one of the things that arianna has been discussing and i've found very compelling is this notion that we should provide opportunities and channels for national service in a variety of industries. this is something industry could do. i've been very involved with teach for america but you could have not only a teacher's corps, you could have medical corps, you could have financial services corps of young people coming out of college, having trouble finding a job but with industry associations, companies saying we're going to create interns and a service program where people can work for a year, maybe two years, learning a trade, learning a profession, whether they're trying to do legal services for america or financial services for america, or health or for that matter engineering, encoding, i think there are many ways for the private sector to work together with government to say he
. proposals in tv ads and on the stump like a million new manufacturing jobs, 100,000 new math and science teachers. feel mores a operational than an actual detailed plan. given the fact there's hunger for change, what change can the incumbent promise? the president has to come up with a good enough explanation of how reelecting him would break the partisan fever in washington. what does romney have to deal with? he hasn't differentiated from george bush's. and his plans lack specifics. in a one-on-one debate, candidates have a lot of control over how aggressive they are. both romney and the president are inexperienced in a one-on-one debate format. few details on the format. the president and romney will be at podiums, standing, not sitting, and there will be no basic time limits on their answers. it's not 90 seconds, buzzer, things like that. it's up to the discretion of the moderator, jim leierer. that's going to be up to him. but there's supposed to be a lot of leeway here over how long the conversations go. the debate is on domestic policy. 90 minutes is supposed to be devoted to the
stage? john gear is in the guest spot today. he chairs the political science department at vanderbilt university. how are you, sir? >> i'm fine. how are you? >> i'm good. i'm a person that believes that campaigns matter, that campaigning and governing are different jobs with different skill sets. can you talk about the impact of how campaigning is like governing and how campaigning is different than governing? >> there's certainly similari similariti similarities. when you're president of the united states, you need to do persuading. there are certain skill sets in common. one of the big differences when you campaign, you can be pretty vague and you can hedge. when you're governing, you have to make choices, and you've got to make decisions that have real policy implications. that's the big difference. >> can you name people who ran bad campaigns and were good presidents, and then people who ran good campaigns. >> i suspect the example of someone running a good campaign but not good as president might be lyndon johnson in '64. he ran a very powerful campaign and won 62%, 63% of the vo
a make or break debate. >> look, david, it's not rocket science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations that he has for himself. but, look, i think part of that was because as i said earlier we met a new mitt romney. we met a mitt romney that wanted to walk away from the central theory of his economic plan, which is his tax cut. i don't have a tax cut that's $4.8 trillion. i'm not going to cut taxes on the rich. i don't have a medicare voucher plan. i love teachers. and i think we need more of them. look, don't believe me. speaker gingrich was pretty eloquent running during the primaries and saying, mitt romney will say absolutely anything to get elected. and if somebody says absolutely anything to get elected you have to wonder what they'll say when they are president of the united states. >> so, speaker, you did say he was fundamentally dishonest after debating him in the primaries. this is not a new attack against romney policy. >> no. and i think that the challenge for the obama people is pretty simple. the president of the united states had 90 m
to science experiments. due to arrive on wednesday. the first of a dozen commercial cargo flights contracted by nasa. >>> two philadelphia brides will never forget their weddings for absolutely the wrong reasons. this weekend three people were arrested when two different wedding parties got into a fight in a hotel lobby. during the fight one of the wedding guests had a heart attack and died. still unclear why the brawl started in the first place. >>> an englishman and a japanese man will share the nobel prize for medicine. the announcement in in norway recognizes their understanding on how cells and organisms development. >>> cases of fungal meningitis are believed to be linked to tainted steroid injections. the maker of those injections is now recalling all of its products. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us now. this just seems to be getting bigger and bigger. >> it does. because i guess what they figured is if they got fungus in one of their products, maybe they got fungus in more of their products. it's a lot of products. some of the biggies are, ok, injectable ste
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)